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sábado, 24 de marzo de 2012

This is state terrorism against Puerto Rico!

These are family members of those massacred on March 21, 1937.  You can see the bullet holes on the wall above their heads.
Museo de la Masacre de Ponce - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNQzBpjL3rk

March 21 was the anniversary of what the American Civil Liberties Union called, “The Ponce Massacre” in its report following the investigation concerning this historic event.  The government tried to justify the massacre by making it look like the police only defended themselves from the Nationalists.  But the truth came out. 

The police, by orders of the colonial chief of police, fired to kill defenseless demonstrators and innocent by-standers.  The United States government did not want any protest to the jailing of the Puerto Rico Nationalist Party leaders.  The massacre resulted in 21 deaths (including two police by their own crossfire) and about 150 wounded on that Easter Sunday in 1937.  

On July 25, 1978, the police again carried out a plan to assassinate two men who advocated independence for Puerto Rico.  They were lured by the police to a mountaintop where the killings occurred.  The police alleged that the men were killed in self-defense.  A senate investigation, however, revealed that they were in fact killed cold-bloodedly by police as they pleaded for their lives.

The most recent act of state terrorism was the assassination of Filiberto Ojeda Ríos by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).  On the very day when Puerto Ricans who favor independence celebrated an uprising during Spanish colonialism called, “El Grito de Lares,” FBI agents shot and allow Ojeda Ríos – a  fugitive and independence advocate -to bleed to death at his home in Hormigueros, Puerto Rico.  The FBI could have arrested him at any time.  But, it chose rather to have a confrontation with him, so that he could be assassinated precisely on this meaningful day for the Puerto Ricans who want independence for their homeland (September 23, 2005).  Then the US has the audacity to publicly say that she is willing to support any decision PR makes with regards to her final political status.  Is there anyone who believes that?

With a history like this, who could believe that decolonization could ever be possible through a process whereby the United States (US) has control over?  This is precisely why we study history.  Obviously, the answer is a definite no!

Therefore, the best way for a serious Puerto Rico (PR) decolonization is by protesting the hypocrisy of democracy in a colony by way of a PR elections boycott, followed by a decolonization process via the United Nations.  But for that, Puerto Ricans must learn our history so that we don’t continue making the same mistakes over and over again!  That reminds me of what my history teacher used to say: “Those who don’t remember the past are condemned to relive it.”  Do we dare to remember?  And if we can’t, terrorism has worked brilliantly!

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